Last edited by Goltikinos
Saturday, May 16, 2020 | History

2 edition of Radio and television in the Soviet Union found in the catalog.

Radio and television in the Soviet Union

Frances Gayle Durham

Radio and television in the Soviet Union

by Frances Gayle Durham

  • 373 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Center for International Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Radio broadcasting -- Soviet Union.,
  • Television broadcasting -- Soviet Union.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementF. Gayle Durham.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[10], 122 p. :
    Number of Pages122
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22342919M

    Radio and Television Report to the American People on the Soviet Arms Buildup in Cuba (Cuban Missile Crisis), PM. Date(s) of Materials: October Soviet Union. Related Records: Radio and television report to the American people on the Soviet arms build-up in Cuba, 22 October   The Soviet Union has stopped jamming Russian-language broadcasts by the American-financed Radio Liberty and two other foreign radio stations, apparently clearing Soviet airwaves of Author: Serge Schmemann.

    The Soviet Union was one of the pre-eminent military powers of the 20th century, and this compendium of essays by military scholars explains how a rag-tag would-be world power that collapsed in disarray during World War I, first fought a complex civil war for five years, then built a military force capable of defeating the Germans in World War II/5(5). Soviet TV Set Production. Experimental TV broadcasts were held in Moscow in the s on the system of low-frame rate TV-system. The first broadcasting of a moving image happened in and the.

    The book examines the role of Western broadcasting to the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe during the Cold War, with a focus on Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty. It includes chapters by radio veterans and by scholars who have conducted research on the subject in once-secret Soviet bloc archives and in Western records. Book TV Weekends on C-SPAN2; responded to reporters' questions on the previous day’s coup in the Soviet Union by communist hard-liners. House Radio and Television Gallery More.


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Radio and television in the Soviet Union by Frances Gayle Durham Download PDF EPUB FB2

Radio and television in the Soviet Union (Book, ) [] Get this from a library. Radio and television in the Soviet Union. [Gayle Durham Hollander; Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The book examines the role of Western broadcasting to the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe during the Cold War, with a focus on Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty.

It includes chapters by radio veterans and by scholars who have conducted research on the subject in once-secret Soviet bloc archives and in Western records.5/5(1). The first in-depth look at Soviet television, Split Signals is an eye-opening account spiced with interviews with major Soviet and American media figures and fascinating descriptions of Soviet TV.

The best all-round study of the Soviet media industry is Roth-Ey, Kristin, Moscow Prime Time: How the Soviet Union Built the Media Empire That Lost the Cultural Cold War (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, ).The important story of Soviet TV in its heyday is told in Evans, Christine, Between Truth and Time: A History of Soviet Central Television (New Haven: Yale University Press, ).Author: Stephen Lovell.

Examines the role of Western broadcasting to the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe during the Cold War, with a focus on Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty.

It includes chapters by radio veterans. They met inin a loud, smoky dance hall where a band played Benny Goodman tunes and jazzed-up Soviet marches.

Ta­mara was unusually self-reliant for a year-old: she had a well-paying job designing women’s wear for the city’s dress shops and came to the dances in pleated skirts and wool crepe hats that she made herself.

Books set in the Former Soviet Union Interested in how people lived in the USSR. Want to get beyond the stereotypes of queues, shortages and Siberian labour camps and read about the human side of the Soviet experience.

These books show us the real story about love, work, holidays, food, childhood, family relationships, and countless other human. With the words, “Hello. This is New York calling,” the U.S. Voice of America (VOA) begins its first radio broadcasts to the Soviet VOA effort was an important part of America’s.

This was achieved by dissembling propaganda into the Soviet Union via the radio, as an attempt to spread pro-capitalist sentiment into the soviet population and create a more pro-Western culture. The Soviet media also used the medium of radio within its own states and other countries as a form of transnational propaganda.

Audiences were enthralled as radio became a national craze. Magazines, books, and even movies featured or included references to radio broadcasting.

Most other industrial nations began radio broadcasts by the mids. France (in Paris) and the Soviet Union (in Moscow) aired broadcasts in The first continuing Chinese radio station appeared in Shanghai early inwhen stations. Amateur Radio Operation in the Soviet Union Radio and Television in the Soviet Union, by this author.

Center i'jr International Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, March, The Soviet amateur call book lists only the ham's call sign, his name and initials, and his location, so that the card may be mailed to his local. Early Radio Broadcasting in the Soviet Union.

The following message was broadcasted on October 30 (November 12 in the new calendar) of via the wireless telegraph with the intention to reach potential revolutionaries in Europe, as well as actual ones in Russia.

Indeed, Soviet revolutionary messages were the first to be recorded in the. Radio and Television Report to the American People on the Soviet Arms Buildup in Cuba, Octo For many years both the Soviet Union and the United States, recognizing this fact, have deployed strategic nuclear weapons with great care, never upsetting the precarious status quo which insured that these weapons would not be used in.

In the Soviet Union, there was the best education in the world for free. In the Soviet Union, children could go to free sports clubs and travel to summer camps, resorts and sanatoriums for free. In the Soviet Union, there was no terrorism in the Caucasus.

The Soviet Caucasus, was a place for resorts, hotels and world's finest mineral : Dmitry Sudakov. Books Music Art & design TV & radio Stage Classical Games Lifestyle Fashion Food Recipes Love & sex There was a sense that the Soviet Union Author: Stevie Chick.

The Soviet Union's radio news and television news was provided almost entirely by the Telegraph Agency of the Soviet Union, commonly known as TASS until Under the rule of Emperor Nikolai II, the first broadcasting system began inand evolved into TASS in Television in the Soviet Union was owned by the state and was under its tight control and censorship.

The governing body in the former Soviet Union was "USSR State Committee for Television and Radio Broadcasting", or USSR Gosteleradio (Государственный комитет по телевидению и радиовещанию СССР, Гостелерадио СССР), which was.

Soviet censorship of literature. Works of print such as the press, advertisements, product labels, and books were censored by Glavlit, an agency established on June 6,to safeguard top secret information from foreign untilthe promulgation of socialist realism was the target of Glavlit in bowdlerizing works of print, while anti-Westernization and nationalism were.

This book is a valuable resource for those interested in the history of music and intellectual life in Russia, Ukraine, and the Soviet Union in the twentieth century and is the first published book on the Madrigal Ensemble.

Number North Texas Lives of Musicians Series. yield approach tothe Soviet Union and the republics today ispublic diplomacy: educa-tional exchanges, information and cultural programs, and international television and radio broadcasting.

• TheAdvisory Commission recommends new program priorities, consolidation of. Perestroika (Russian for "restructuring") refers to a series of political and economic reforms meant to kickstart the stagnant s economy of the Soviet Union.Mr.

Donahue and Mr. Pozner spoke about a new joint television venture scheduled to be launched on Soviet TV. Mr. Pozner spoke about the failed coup by Communist hard-liners and collapse of.History Beginning. The first All-Union Radio station, under the Ministry of Posts and Telegraphs, was opened upon Lenin's initiative (for a "newspaper without a paper" as the best means of public information) in November On Novem the first regular broadcast was produced in Moscow on the Comintern radio station.

Inthe Radio Commission of the Central Committee of the RCP.